first_for_prints

Canvas | Prints | Posters | Wall Art – Quality Prints

Archive for the tag “http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/custom-prints-14-w.asp”

First For Prints _ NEW STOCK_ ENLARGE YOUR PHOTOS FOR £2.95

http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

We have new images, artists, products and more. Visit us at http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/ and take a look.

If you would like  your own photos or artwork printed this is the place to visit.

Print your photo on A3 210 gsm super gloss for just £2.95

Mrs R J Kellingwell just enlarged her photo from Australia _ she paid £2.95 for an A3 high gloss print _ We framed it for £19.99 and shipped

 

Advertisements

Sale of a major Constable – The Lock – News!

http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

“For Spain, the loss of The Lock is of a seriousness that is difficult to measure,” wrote Francisco Calvo Serraller, former director of the Prado Museum, in the Spanish daily El País. “Faced by this terrible loss, any art lover will feel not only terrible pain, but also a legitimate rage resulting from the shady, tricky and unexplained way this awful affair has been carried out.”

ohn Constable’s The Lock (1824), one of the English painter’s acknowledged masterpieces, depicts an idyllic and quintessentially English pastoral scene in which the sky and atmosphere are endowed with a vibrancy the Impressionists would later aspire to. In recent years the painting has hung in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, placed there on extended loan from the personal collection of the Baroness Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza.

Not anymore. Last summer the baroness abruptly withdrew the painting from the museum to put it up for auction at Christie’s London, where in July it fetched £22.4 million ($35.2 million). The sale provoked anger in Spanish art circles, protest among museum trustees, and public squabbling among members of the Thyssen-Bornemisza family.

 

For other famous art workf please visit http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

Calling all Artists, Illustators, Painters, …

Calling all Artists, Illustrators, Painters, …

Want to sell your art work with no hassle and at your price?

http://www.firstforprints.co.uk offers affordable art prints, posters, books and more.

For the month of May ONLY we are offering the chance to sell your art through our site.

  •  We take just 2% commission

  • You decide the selling price (no limits at all)

  • … Whether you want to sell your original, reproduction or a print

  • Tell us your time scales

  • Send us your image

  • … and we will list you as a quest artist

  • If you art sells you receive an email, and the fund are transferred.

  • We do all the posting and client relations

If you would like to be involved please contact us at

firstforprints@gmail.com

… or go to the website

 

Below are just some of the recent sales that our quest artists have sold – ‘Nicholas Lenahorn’

 

http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/contact-us-2-w.asp

Who is Edward Lear? First For Prints Investigates

Edward Lear (12 May 1812 – 29 January 1888) was a British artist, illustrator, author, and poet, renowned today primarily for his literary nonsense, in poetry and prose, and especially his limericks, a form that he popularised.

Visit First For Prints http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/index.asp for low cost art prints, canvases, books, art supplies, materials, and large banners and posters.

Art Prints from £4.95

Lear was already drawing “for bread and cheese” by the time he was aged 16 and soon developed into a serious “ornithological draughtsman” employed by the Zoological Society and then from 1832 to 1836 by the Earl of Derby, who had a private menagerie. His first publication, published when he was 19, was Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae, or Parrots in 1830. His paintings were well received and he was favourably compared with Audubon.

Lear was born into a middle-class family in the village of Holloway, the 21st child of Ann and Jeremiah Lear. He was raised by his eldest sister, also named Ann, 21 years his senior. Ann doted on Lear and continued to mother him until her death, when Lear was almost 50 years of age. Due to the family’s failing financial fortune, at age four he and his sister had to leave the family home and set up house together.

Lear suffered from health problems. From the age of six he suffered frequent grand mal epileptic seizures, and bronchitis, asthma, and in later life, partial blindness. Lear experienced his first seizure at a fair near Highgate with his father. The event scared and embarrassed him. Lear felt lifelong guilt and shame for his epileptic condition. His adult diaries indicate that he always sensed the onset of a seizure in time to remove himself from public view. How Lear was able to anticipate them is not known, but many people with epilepsy report a ringing in their ears (tinnitus) or an aura before the onset of a seizure. In Lear’s time epilepsy was believed to be associated with demonic possession, which contributed to his feelings of guilt and loneliness. When Lear was about seven he began to show signs of depression, possibly due to the constant instability of his childhood. He suffered from periods of severe depression which he referred to as “the Morbids.”

What is Art Nouveau? First For Prints Investigates

Art Nouveau is an international philosophy and style of art, architecture and applied art—especially the decorative arts—that were most popular during 1890–191] The name “Art Nouveau” is French for “new art”. It is known also as Jugendstil, German for “youth style”, named after the magazine Jugend which promoted it, as Modern (Модерн) in Russia, perhaps named after Parisian gallery “La Maison Moderne”, as Secession in Austria-Hungary and its successor states after the Viennese group of artists, and, in Italy, as Stile Liberty from the department store in London, Liberty & Co., which popularised the style.

Britain

In the United Kingdom, Art Nouveau developed out of the Arts and Crafts Movement. The beginning of an Art Nouveau style can be recognized during the 1880s, in a few progressive designs such as the architect-designer Arthur Mackmurdo’s book cover design for his essay on the city churches of Sir Christopher Wren, published during 1883. Some free-flowing wrought iron from the 1880s could also be adduced, or some flat floral textile designs, most of which owed some impetus to patterns of 19th century design. The most important location in Britain eventually became Glasgow, with the creations of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his colleagues. The cluster of artists known as the Dunbar School were active in, what was known in Scotland, as Art Noo-voo.

Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo (12 December 1851 – 15 March 1942) was a progressive English architect and designer, who influenced the Arts and Crafts Movement, notably through the Century Guild of Artists, which he set up in partnership with Selwyn Image in 1882.

Mackmurdo was the son of a wealthy chemical manufacturer. He was educated at Felsted School, and was first trained under the architect T. Chatfield Clarke, from whom he claimed to have learnt nothing. Then, in 1869, he became an assistant to the Gothic Revival architect James Brooks. In 1873, he visited John Ruskin’s School of Drawing, and accompanied Ruskin to Italy in 1874. He stayed on to study in Florence for a while; despite the influence of Ruskin, the Italian architecture he was most impressed by was that of the Renaissance. That same year, Mackmurdo opened his own architectural practice at 28, Southampton Street, in London.

Visit First For Prints to find out more – http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

 

History of the Mona Lisa – First For Prints Investigates

 

The Mona Lisa is 16th century oil painting created by the renowned Leonardo da Vinci. The work of art depicts an enigmatic woman gazing at the viewer, and it is said that if you move across the room while looking into her eyes, they’ll follow you. It is definitely one of the most popular paintings worldwide and has been the center of many artistic, religious, and theoretical debates. The French government currently owns the Mona Lisa and it is featured at the Musee du Louvre in Paris. The painting can also be referred to as La Gioconda or La Joconde.
The name of the painting stems from the name of the woman in the portrait, Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a wealthy businessman in Florence, Italy named Francesco del Giocondo. Mona means ‘my lady’ or ‘madam’ in modern Italian, so the title is simply Madam Lisa. Art historians agree that Leonardo da Vinci likely began painting the Mona Lisa in 1503, and completed it within 4 years. In 1516 the King of France, King Francois, bought the painting and it is thought that after Leonardo’s death the painting was cut down. Some speculators think that the original had columns on both sides of the lady, whereas other art critics believe that the painting was never cut down in size. It has been suggested that there were 2 versions of the Mona Lisa painting, but many historians reject the second version. The duplicate copy can be found at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. After the French revolution the painting was moved to the Louvre, and Napoleon had it placed in his bedroom for a short time before it was returned to the Louvre. The popularity of the Mona Lisa increased in the mid 19th century because of the Symbolist movement. The painting was thought to encompass a sort of feminine mystique.
In 1911 the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre. The art thief hid in a broom closet until the museum closed, stole the painting, hid it under his jacket and walked out the front door. Eduardo de Valfierno was the mastermind behind the theft and has planned to make copies of the original and sell them as the real thing. Eventually, in 1913, he was caught when trying to sell the original to a Florence art dealer. The Mona Lisa is most famous for her facial expression, her enigmatic smile and da Vinci’s mastering of tone and color in the painting. There is much mythology and interpretations relating to the painting that mystify the world. Many art critics and art history buffs suggest that the Mona Lisa is actually a portrait of da Vinci himself in feminine form. In addition, most viewers see the meaning behind Mona Lisa’s smile very differently.

Limited Edition Prints and Sketches – Nicholas Lenahorn

Nicholas Lenahorn is a southern photogapher and interio designer who has turned his eye to painting and sketching.

First For Prints have agreed sole trader of his early works through http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

Our Home Page – Take a look and Explore – First For Prints

First For Prints – Offers Now On!!!

Free Delivery on Orders over £40

Fine Art on Canvas from under £10

Prints and Posters from £4.95

Sharp Images and Colour Correction

WE PRINT YOUR PHOTOS to high quality canvas

£39.99

Tracing Warhol’s origins as the sickly child of Ruthenian immigrants in working-class Pittsburgh to his transformation into New York’s dark prince of Pop and finally into the world’s most successful ‘business artist’, “Andy Warhol “Giant” Size” provides an appropriately larger-than-life look at the celebrated artist’s career. Cultural critic Dave Hickey provides a compelling essay on Warhol’s geek-to-guru evolution while chapter openers by Warhol friends and insiders give special insight into the way the enigmatic artist led his life and made his art. More than 2,000 illustrations culled from rarely seen archival material, documentary photography, and artwork not only provide a full picture of the artist’s life but a telling look at late twentieth-century popular culture. Warhol’s little-explored early career as a successful commercial illustrator and designer, his importance as a co-creator of the Pop movement, his midcareer switch to filmmaker and manager of the Velvet Underground, his founding of Interview magazine, and his bid for the hearts and pocketbooks of the high-flying glitterati are shown throughout this stunning new volume.

£8.95 LAGE

910mm x 610mm – Poster Quality

 

Classic Photography – First For Prints

First For Prints has new Classic Photography in stock… Prints and Posters from £4.95 plus free delivery on canvases over £40

http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

 

Post Impressionism – First For Prints Investigates

All About Impressionism

Georges Seurat (1859-1891) The Channel at Gravelines, Evening (oil on canvas, 1890)

Impressionism was the first movement in the canon of modern art. Like most revolutionary styles it was gradually absorbed into the mainstream and its limitations became frustrating to the succeeding generation. Artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin and Georges Seurat, although steeped in the traditions of Impressionism, pushed the boundaries of the style in different creative directions and in doing so laid the foundations for the art of the 20th century. Their name was derived from the title of the exhibition ‘Manet and the Post-Impressionists’ which was organised in London by the English artist and critic Roger Fry in the winter of 1910-11. For historical convenience these artists have been labeled as Post Impressionists but, apart from their Impressionist influence, they don’t have that much in common.

Tahitian Landscape (oil on canvas, 1893)

Gauguin’s work can be split into two phases: an early period spent painting around the rustic town of Port Aven in Brittany; and a later period (post 1891) in search of the primitive lifestyle in Tahiti and the Marquesas Islands in the South Pacific. He fused his symbolic use of colour with images of both environments to create a highly personal and expressive vision that pushed art towards the exhilarating style of Fauvism.

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: