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Archive for the month “April, 2012”

History of the Mona Lisa – First For Prints Investigates

 

The Mona Lisa is 16th century oil painting created by the renowned Leonardo da Vinci. The work of art depicts an enigmatic woman gazing at the viewer, and it is said that if you move across the room while looking into her eyes, they’ll follow you. It is definitely one of the most popular paintings worldwide and has been the center of many artistic, religious, and theoretical debates. The French government currently owns the Mona Lisa and it is featured at the Musee du Louvre in Paris. The painting can also be referred to as La Gioconda or La Joconde.
The name of the painting stems from the name of the woman in the portrait, Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a wealthy businessman in Florence, Italy named Francesco del Giocondo. Mona means ‘my lady’ or ‘madam’ in modern Italian, so the title is simply Madam Lisa. Art historians agree that Leonardo da Vinci likely began painting the Mona Lisa in 1503, and completed it within 4 years. In 1516 the King of France, King Francois, bought the painting and it is thought that after Leonardo’s death the painting was cut down. Some speculators think that the original had columns on both sides of the lady, whereas other art critics believe that the painting was never cut down in size. It has been suggested that there were 2 versions of the Mona Lisa painting, but many historians reject the second version. The duplicate copy can be found at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. After the French revolution the painting was moved to the Louvre, and Napoleon had it placed in his bedroom for a short time before it was returned to the Louvre. The popularity of the Mona Lisa increased in the mid 19th century because of the Symbolist movement. The painting was thought to encompass a sort of feminine mystique.
In 1911 the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre. The art thief hid in a broom closet until the museum closed, stole the painting, hid it under his jacket and walked out the front door. Eduardo de Valfierno was the mastermind behind the theft and has planned to make copies of the original and sell them as the real thing. Eventually, in 1913, he was caught when trying to sell the original to a Florence art dealer. The Mona Lisa is most famous for her facial expression, her enigmatic smile and da Vinci’s mastering of tone and color in the painting. There is much mythology and interpretations relating to the painting that mystify the world. Many art critics and art history buffs suggest that the Mona Lisa is actually a portrait of da Vinci himself in feminine form. In addition, most viewers see the meaning behind Mona Lisa’s smile very differently.

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Limited Edition Prints and Sketches – Nicholas Lenahorn

Nicholas Lenahorn is a southern photogapher and interio designer who has turned his eye to painting and sketching.

First For Prints have agreed sole trader of his early works through http://www.firstforprints.co.uk/

Our Home Page – Take a look and Explore – First For Prints

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Tracing Warhol’s origins as the sickly child of Ruthenian immigrants in working-class Pittsburgh to his transformation into New York’s dark prince of Pop and finally into the world’s most successful ‘business artist’, “Andy Warhol “Giant” Size” provides an appropriately larger-than-life look at the celebrated artist’s career. Cultural critic Dave Hickey provides a compelling essay on Warhol’s geek-to-guru evolution while chapter openers by Warhol friends and insiders give special insight into the way the enigmatic artist led his life and made his art. More than 2,000 illustrations culled from rarely seen archival material, documentary photography, and artwork not only provide a full picture of the artist’s life but a telling look at late twentieth-century popular culture. Warhol’s little-explored early career as a successful commercial illustrator and designer, his importance as a co-creator of the Pop movement, his midcareer switch to filmmaker and manager of the Velvet Underground, his founding of Interview magazine, and his bid for the hearts and pocketbooks of the high-flying glitterati are shown throughout this stunning new volume.

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910mm x 610mm – Poster Quality

 

Classic Photography – First For Prints

First For Prints has new Classic Photography in stock… Prints and Posters from £4.95 plus free delivery on canvases over £40

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Pioneers of Photography – First For Prints Investigates

Louis Daguerre  devised the daguerreotype, the first successful form of   permanent photography. The French physicist developed the process for   transferring photographs onto silver-coated copper plates. His discovery was   made by an accident, according to the writer Robert Leggat, who said   Daguerre put an exposed plate in a chemical cupboard in 1835 only to later   find it have developed a latent image. The daguerreotype process was   unveiled at the French Academy of Sciences in Paris in 1839. It became the   first commercially successful was of getting permanent images from a camera.

Louis Jacques Daguerre’s first surviving daguerreotype image, of a   collection of plaster casts on a window ledge, which he produced on a silver   plate, in 1837

 

 

 

Post Impressionism – First For Prints Investigates

All About Impressionism

Georges Seurat (1859-1891) The Channel at Gravelines, Evening (oil on canvas, 1890)

Impressionism was the first movement in the canon of modern art. Like most revolutionary styles it was gradually absorbed into the mainstream and its limitations became frustrating to the succeeding generation. Artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin and Georges Seurat, although steeped in the traditions of Impressionism, pushed the boundaries of the style in different creative directions and in doing so laid the foundations for the art of the 20th century. Their name was derived from the title of the exhibition ‘Manet and the Post-Impressionists’ which was organised in London by the English artist and critic Roger Fry in the winter of 1910-11. For historical convenience these artists have been labeled as Post Impressionists but, apart from their Impressionist influence, they don’t have that much in common.

Tahitian Landscape (oil on canvas, 1893)

Gauguin’s work can be split into two phases: an early period spent painting around the rustic town of Port Aven in Brittany; and a later period (post 1891) in search of the primitive lifestyle in Tahiti and the Marquesas Islands in the South Pacific. He fused his symbolic use of colour with images of both environments to create a highly personal and expressive vision that pushed art towards the exhilarating style of Fauvism.

The Best Art Museums in Paris – First For Prints Investigates

Three important attractions. The Louvre and Orsay Museums, and the Pompidou Center, have some of the best art collections in the world.

The Louvre Museum – The best art museum in the world is right here in Paris. Popular even before The DaVinci Code, Musee du Louvre has much, much more to offer visitors besides the Mona Lisa. The lower ground floor is famous for its top examples of Egyptian, Greek and Roman Antiquities. The ground floor, with one of the best collections of 16th – 19th century Italian sculptures in the world, also features sculptures from 5th – 18th century France. A museum visitor will find Winged Victory on the stairs to the first floor, and it is this floor which has the Mona Lisa (follow the large, slow-moving crowd) and many other top examples of Italian paintings from the 13th to the 17th century. Art from the Middle Ages and the Restoration also abound. The second floor of the Louvre Museum features German, Flemish and Dutch paintings and drawings, as well as prints, paintings and drawings from 14th-17th century France. Any one of the floors of the Louvre Museum would be a world-class museum on its own. When seen together, it’s almost difficult to get one’s mind around the sheer quantity of these amazing ancient, Medieval and Classical art collections.

The Orsay Museum – Chronologically starting roughly when the art of the Louvre ends, Musee du Orsay provides the link between the Louvre and the Pompidou. The Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Periods (mid-19th century to early 20th century) are featured in full splendor at the Orsay Museum; set up to be accessible, yet commanding respect from museum visitors, the Orsay is many Paris travelers’ favorite big museum. The ground floor features the earliest art in the Orsay. Sculptures flank the center aisle here, with Pre-Impressionism works by Degas, Delacroix, Manet, Monet and more among the paintings, drawings and decorative arts on this floor. The middle level has the famous Seine, Rodin, and Lille Terraces, along with paintings and sculptures by Denis, Galle, Klimt, Munch, and other famous artists. The upper level of the Orsay Museum is where the Impressionism and Post-Impressionism art really shines. More Degas, along with Cezanne, Gauguin, Manet, Matisse, Monet, Pissaro, Renoir, Seurat, Van Gogh and Whistler are here, each work of art astonishing in its accessibility. It’s exciting to be amid all these top examples of famous art, and it’s completely acceptable to photograph many of these works, providing the museum guest turns of the camera flash.

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The Pompidou Center – Centre Pompidou is clearly a home for modern art; it’s hard to miss the brightly colored tubes and pipes making up the exterior architecture while walking in its relatively staid Paris neighborhood. The Musee National d’Art Moderne, or Museum of Modern Art, is at the Pompidou, along with a public library and performance spaces. No vacation in Paris is complete, for a modern art buff anyway, without a visit to the Pompidou. The Dada and Surrealism movements are well represented at the Pompidou. Warhol, Jackson Pollack, Rothko, Kandinsky, Miro and Picasso are all featured prominently here, along with Marcel Duchamps and his “ready-made” works of art.

The National Centre for Art and Culture Georges Pompidou was the brainchild of President Georges Pompidou in the heart of Paris to create an original cultural institution entirely dedicated to creating modern and contemporary art where voisineraient with theater, music, movies, books, and the spoken word … Located in the heart of Paris, in an iconic piece of architecture of the twentieth century, designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, Pompidou Centre opened in 1977. Renovated from 1997 to December 1999, it opened to the public on 1 January 2000, by offering expanded museum spaces, surfaces and enhanced reception. It is again therefore one of the most visited attractions in France. Some 6 million visitors per year, the Centre Pompidou’s hosted in 30 years, nearly 190 million visitors.

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ARTWORK – ART PRINTS | BOOKS | PRINTING

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99*365 little flower of forsythia

Amazing Photography!

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h2o by Joanna

Still a bit yellow for Easter… another little flower on my mirror 😀

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What Digester Eggs Hatch

Amazing Photography!

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Take a look … free prints if you contact us.

tugster: a waterblog

Bowsprite made my jolly Easter even jollier with her post here, rendering the silvery ovoids of Newtown Creek aubergine.  These digester eggs are an essential part of keeping the harbor clean.  See this DEP link as a starter.  Boston has similar structures on Deer Island, which are part of the same process.

Here’s another shot of Newtown Creek’s facility, as viewed from Peter Cooper Village across the East River.

And yet another view . . .  as seen from a boat on the Creek, the loins of 19th century industrial New York.  Yes, that’s the now-scrapped Kristin Poling  back in 2010.

As bowsprite points out in her post . . . yes, there is a proverbial “recreation area intertwined with a waste disposal equipment” around these eggs . . .  a boat launch, a minipark with historical info on local names like this.

This DEP…

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